• Data Entry Clerk Job Purpose:

              Maintainance of database by entering new and updated customer and account information.


              Data Entry Clerk Job Duties:
              • Prepares source data for computer entry by compiling and sorting information; establishing entry priorities.
              • Processes customer and account source documents by reviewing data for deficiencies; resolving discrepancies by using standard procedures or returning incomplete documents to the team leader for resolution.
              • Enters customer and account data by inputting alphabetic and numeric information on keyboard or optical scanner according to screen format.
              • Maintains data entry requirements by following data program techniques and procedures.
              • Verifies entered customer and account data by reviewing, correcting, deleting, or reentering data; combining data from both systems when account information is incomplete; purging files to eliminate duplication of data.
              • Tests customer and account system changes and upgrades by inputting new data; reviewing output.
              • Secures information by completing data base backups.
              • Maintains operations by following policies and procedures; reporting needed changes.
              • Maintains customer confidence and protects operations by keeping information confidential.
              • Contributes to team effort by accomplishing related results as needed.

              Database maintenance is an activity designed to keep a database running smoothly. A number of different systems can be used to build and maintain databases, with one popular example being MYSQL. The maintenance of databases is generally performed by people who are comfortable and familiar with the database system and the specifics of the particular database, although some maintenance tasks can be performed by people who do not have experience.

              Databases are used to maintain a library of information in a well organized, accessible format. They usually are not static, however, because changes are constantly being made as material is added, removed, and moved around. People may also change parameters within the database, decide to use different indexing systems, and so forth. Over time, this can cause the database to start to malfunction. Database maintenance is used to keep the database clean and well organized so that it will not lose functionality.

              One important aspect of maintaining a database is simply backing up the data so that, if anything happens, there will be another copy available. Some databasing systems actually do this automatically, sending a backup to another location every day, every week, or within any other set period of time. Backups are usually not enough, however.


          • Document Conversion
              Document conversion is the act of converting one document's format to another, which allows the document to be read in many more applications. Documents can be converted into ...
              • other source document formats
              • consumer formats
              • structured data

              The conversion of the file is usually done by the application that it was created with, though there are also various third-party tools to perform it. Most file formats can be disassembled with a hex editor. Alternatively conversions can be automatically provided by Web services that connect to a document storage or delivery system - such as file directory or a document / content management applications. The content transformation services can run on a local server, in the Web or in the cloud. Conversion tools can also be combined with a delivery component - that publishes converted data into a database, filesystem or other systems.


          • Document Scanning
              Document imaging is an information technology category for systems capable of replicating documents commonly used in business. Document imaging systems can take many forms including microfilm, on demand printers, facsimile machines, copiers, multifunction printers, document scanners, computer output microfilm (COM) and archive writers. Since the 1990s, "document imaging" has been used to describe software-based computer systems that capture, store and reprint images.

              Document imaging is a form of enterprise content management. In the early days of content management technologies, the term "document imaging" was used interchangeably with "document image management" as the industry tried to separate itself from the micrographic and reprographic technologies.

              In the late 1980s, a new document management technology emerged: electronic document management. This technology was built around the need to manage and secure the escalating volume of electronic documents (spreadsheets, word-processing documents, PDFs, e-mails) created in organizations.


          • Form Processing
              Forms processing is a process by which one can capture information entered into data fields and convert it into an electronic format. This can be done manually or automatically, but the general process is that hard copy data is filled out by humans and then "captured" from their respective fields and entered into a database or other electronic format.

              In the broadest sense, forms processing systems can range from the processing of small application forms to large scale survey forms with multiple pages. There are several common issues involved in forms processing when done manually. These are a lot of tedious human efforts put in, the data keyed in by the user may result in typos, and many hours of labor result from this lengthy process. If the forms are processed using computer software driven applications these common issues can be resolved and minimized to great extent.


          • Data Capture
              Automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

              AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file. The file is then stored and at a later time it can be analyzed by a computer, or compared with other files in a database to verify identity or to provide authorization to enter a secured system. Capturing of data can be done in various ways; the best method depends on application. AIDC also refers to the methods of recognizing objects, getting information about them and entering that data or feeding it directly into computer systems without any human involvement. Automatic identification and data capture technologies include barcodes, RFID, bokodes, OCR, magnetic stripes, smart cards and biometrics (like iris and facial recognition system).

              In biometric security systems, capture is the acquisition of or the process of acquiring and identifying characteristics such as finger image, palm image, facial image, iris print or voice print which involves audio data and the rest all involves video data.

              Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide. RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems because of its capability to track moving objects. These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive.


          • Order Processing
              Order Processing Order processing is a key element of Order fulfillment. Order processing operations or facilities are commonly called "distribution centers". "Order processing" is the term generally used to describe the process or the work flow associated with the picking, packing and delivery of the packed item(s) to a shipping carrier. The specific "order fulfillment process" or the operational procedures of distribution centers are determined by many factors. Each distribution center has its own unique requirements or priorities. There is no "one size fits all" process that universally provides the most efficient operation. Some of the factors that determine the specific process flow of a distribution center are:
              • The nature of the shipped product - shipping eggs and shipping shirts can require differing fulfillment processes
              • The nature of the orders - the number of differing items and quantities of each item in orders
              • The nature of the shipping packaging - cases, totes, envelopes, pallets can create process variations
              • Shipping costs - consolidation of orders, shipping pre-sort can change processing operations
              • Availability and cost and productivity of workforce - can create trade-off decisions in automation and manual processing operations
              • Timeliness of shipment windows - when shipments need to be completed based on carriers can create processing variations
              • Availability of capital expenditure dollars - influence on manual verses automated process decisions and longer term benefits
              • Value of product shipped - the ratio of the value of the shipped product and the order fulfillment cost
              • Seasonality variations in outbound volume - amount and duration of seasonal peaks and valleys of outbound volume
              • Predictability of future volume, product and order profiles -
              • Predictability of distribution network - whether or not the network itself is going to change

              This list is only a small sample of factors that influence the choice of a distribution centers operational procedures. Because each factor has varying importance in each organization the net effect is that each organization has unique processing requirements.

              The effect of Globalization has immense impacts on much of the order fulfillment but its impact is felt most in transportation and distribution.


          • Data Capture ...
              Automatic identification and data capture (AIDC) refers to the methods of automatically identifying objects, collecting data about them, and entering that data directly into computer systems (i.e. without human involvement). Technologies typically considered as part of AIDC include bar codes, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), biometrics, magnetic stripes, Optical Character Recognition (OCR), smart cards, and voice recognition. AIDC is also commonly referred to as “Automatic Identification,” “Auto-ID,” and "Automatic Data Capture."

              AIDC is the process or means of obtaining external data, particularly through analysis of images, sounds or videos. To capture data, a transducer is employed which converts the actual image or a sound into a digital file. The file is then stored and at a later time it can be analyzed by a computer, or compared with other files in a database to verify identity or to provide authorization to enter a secured system. Capturing of data can be done in various ways; the best method depends on application. AIDC also refers to the methods of recognizing objects, getting information about them and entering that data or feeding it directly into computer systems without any human involvement. Automatic identification and data capture technologies include barcodes, RFID, bokodes, OCR, magnetic stripes, smart cards and biometrics (like iris and facial recognition system).

              In biometric security systems, capture is the acquisition of or the process of acquiring and identifying characteristics such as finger image, palm image, facial image, iris print or voice print which involves audio data and the rest all involves video data.

              Radio frequency identification (RFID) is relatively a new AIDC technology which was first developed in 1980’s. The technology acts as a base in automated data collection, identification and analysis systems worldwide. RFID has found its importance in a wide range of markets including livestock identification and Automated Vehicle Identification (AVI) systems because of its capability to track moving objects. These automated wireless AIDC systems are effective in manufacturing environments where barcode labels could not survive

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